Call for KX to be managed as a community – not just a strategic transport hub

King’s Cross Community Projects (KCCP: a local charitable trust) has just released the first ever analysis of the recently published Indices of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) from the Government’s Department for Communities and Local Government for King’s Cross finding that it is in the top 10% most deprived areas in the country for air quality, road traffic accidents, household overcrowding, homelessness and ability to afford home ownership.

Divided-kx “King’s Cross is a fragmented area for so many reasons (KX a divided community, the map on the right shows the political and physical barriers). Despite the barriers we remain a community with our own identity and shared problems. We struggle here to get anything done by the powers that be – we are, in many ways, a forgotten community ignored by big regeneration and transport developments. We are split between two boroughs, a strategic transport authority and various developers so we fall between the stools.” says KCCP. “Lack of engagement or consultation, projects taking place that further fragment the community, lengthy blights with shops and amenities closing, vehicles prioritised over pedestrians and cyclists despite immediate and long-term dangers are a few examples of how we are ignored.”

The Trust was set up to support improvement of the area within half a mile radius of King’s Cross Station (shown in the maps). They feel strongly that the piecemeal approach taken by planners and developers over the years continues to blight this densely populated and multiply deprived community. The trustees of KCCP are all local and have a proven track record of taking action to improve their neighbourhood.

KCCP’s findings from the IMD include:
IMD-KX There are 37 'super output areas' that make up King's Cross (these are areas the Government uses to produce very localised results – they are even smaller than wards, see map on the left). Of these, 34 (90%) fall into the top 10% most deprived in the country on the basis of air quality and road traffic accidents.

33 (90%) are in the top 10% most deprived on the basis of household overcrowding, homelessness and ability to afford owner-occupation and 10 fall into the top 10% on the basis of income.

Areas of Kings Cross fall into the top 10% most deprived in the country for crime, employment, health & disability, housing & services, income, outdoor & indoor living environment and wider barriers.

Says KCCP: “We want to make a difference to the existing community and voluntary groups working hard in the area to tackle these issues. We plan to launch a new project shortly to do just that. We want to identify all the groups working here, what they do, what they want to do and how they want KCCP to practically support them. We maybe a small trust, but we can punch very high. The last thing we want to do is duplicate anything already happening or planned. We want to add value to the hard graft already being done by struggling community groups in King’s Cross – in the ways they tell us will support them.”

KCCP will be researching community groups operating within a half mile of King’s Cross Station to find this out. For now they would welcome groups contacting them by email.

(Note: KCCP used the Government's deprivation statistics to map King's Cross and show how it fairs as a community. This has never been done before)

About Sophie Talbot

Sophie runs a small business designing websites for small businesses and community groups. http://www.cookiewp.com She also manages King's Cross Community Projects http://www.kccp.org.uk
This entry was posted in Current Affairs, Planning, Licensing and Regulation, Road Safety in Kings Cross. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Call for KX to be managed as a community – not just a strategic transport hub

  1. Pingback: The patch | kccp.org.uk

  2. Pingback: The patch | King's Cross Community Projects

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